Eye Smart Eye Check

EyeSmart EyeCheck

EyeSmartTM EyeCheck is a new program recently launched by the American Academy of Ophthalmology to combat undetected eye disease and visual impairment among at-risk populations in the United States. The announcement comes as new research from the Los Angeles Latino Eye Study (LALES) shows that Latinos have higher rates of visual impairment, blindness, diabetic retinopathy and cataracts than non-Hispanic whites. Through the new EyeSmart EyeCheck initiative, the Academy and its partners will work to raise awareness and understanding of the impact of eye disease and visual impairment, particularly among minority populations who disproportionately lack access to care. The initial emphasis will be on the Latino community. LALES findings reveal the high rate of visual impairment in Latinos. These rates are higher than any other racial/ethnic group studied in the United States.

One of the components of the program will be facilitating free screenings to help identify undiagnosed visual impairment and eye disease among populations at greatest risk and with limited access to health care services. The first pilot screening will take place July 25 in Los Angeles at the Lady Queen of Angels Church.

The Academy’s EyeSmart EyeCheck program will be working with EyeCare America and local health departments and community clinics to provide sources for care once a diagnosis is made. For more information on the program visit: www.geteyesmart.org/eyesmart/eyecheck.

This article reprinted with permission from the American Academy of Ophthalmology’s EyeSmartTM campaign (www.geteyesmart.org).

3D Technology and Vision

3D Technology and Vision

Today, 3-D movie, TV and video games are rapidly coming on the market. Experts, like Avatar director James Cameron, predict all visual entertainment will soon be 3-D. Yet, there are some people who literally can’t stomach the 3D technology and find they have visual problems when viewing it. It has raised questions and concerns for both the public and product makers and you will most likely be seeing news stories about this topic (if you haven’t already). Some of the side effects for people viewing 3-D images are headaches, eyestrain, or motion sickness. Ophthalmologists are currently working to help the public understand:

  • How the eye views 3-D images, and how this differs from normal, everyday depth perception,
  • Why 3-D causes visual discomfort or headaches for some, and
  • What impact this technology may have on vision

Some product makers are considering putting advisory labels on their products warning consumers to consult with eye doctors before buying. Samsung recently included a multi-point health warning with its newly-shipped 3-D TVs. People born with a lazy eye (amblyopia), or crossed eyes (strabismus) may not get the 3-D effect, unless the condition was corrected early, best before age 1. Some people whose eyes have a tendency to turn in or out, (expophoria or esophoria), have to work harder to fuse the images and they may feel more strain, and possibly headaches. Stay tuned for more information to come about 3D technology and how it interacts with our visual system.

This article reprinted with permission from the American Academy of Ophthalmology’s EyeSmartTM campaign (www.geteyesmart.org).